Mid-Level Management Is the Air Force’s Latest Fix for Its Nuclear Problems

An airman at Minot Air Force Base inspects one of the components on a Minuteman III missile, on April 11, 2013.

5th Bomb Wing Public Affairs/Airman 1st Class Kristoffer Kaubisch

AA Font size + Print

An airman at Minot Air Force Base inspects one of the components on a Minuteman III missile, on April 11, 2013.

Still recovering from the recent scandals at its Global Strike Command, the Air Force is changing how it manages America's Minuteman 3 nukes. By Rachel Oswald

After several nuclear-sector lapses, U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command is creating a new position designed as a conduit between missileers and commanders.

Each of the nine missile squadrons of the 20th Air Force will get its own assistant director of operations, or “ADOs,” before summer’s end, according to a Tuesday command press release. The assistant director will be a middle-management position charged with supporting command leadership in its efforts to direct junior nuclear personnel responsible for maintaining, operating and protecting the country’s arsenal of Minuteman 3 intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Maj. Scott Fleming, who will become one of the first assistant directors of operations, said the decision to prioritize creation of the position came out of the command’s ongoing Force Improvement Program. The initiative was launched in February to address a number of professionalism and morale problems within the nuclear missileer force that were brought to light in the last year.

I’m glad to see they are pursuing this,” Fleming said in released comments. “Historically in the ICBM units, there has been a large gap between the leadership level and those pulling the duty out there in the field. If you look at the bomber units and most of the flying units, it’s not quite set up that way. They have more mid-level management and leadership from ADOs who are able to bridge that gap.”

Lt. Col. Steven Folds of the 20th Air Force said he was optimistic that the new operations officers would be helpful in translating the orders of commanders into a language that young personnel in their first assignments and enlisted crews could understand.

They will also ensure appropriate training is accomplished for all crew members under their charge and will direct additional training as those needs are identified,” he said.

Close [ x ] More from DefenseOne
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from DefenseOne.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • Software-Defined Networking

    So many demands are being placed on federal information technology networks, which must handle vast amounts of data, accommodate voice and video, and cope with a multitude of highly connected devices while keeping government information secure from cyber threats. This issue brief discusses the state of SDN in the federal government and the path forward.

    Download
  • Military Readiness: Ensuring Readiness with Analytic Insight

    To determine military readiness, decision makers in defense organizations must develop an understanding of complex inter-relationships among readiness variables. For example, how will an anticipated change in a readiness input really impact readiness at the unit level and, equally important, how will it impact readiness outside of the unit? Learn how to form a more sophisticated and accurate understanding of readiness and make decisions in a timely and cost-effective manner.

    Download
  • Cyber Risk Report: Cybercrime Trends from 2016

    In our first half 2016 cyber trends report, SurfWatch Labs threat intelligence analysts noted one key theme – the interconnected nature of cybercrime – and the second half of the year saw organizations continuing to struggle with that reality. The number of potential cyber threats, the pool of already compromised information, and the ease of finding increasingly sophisticated cybercriminal tools continued to snowball throughout the year.

    Download
  • A New Security Architecture for Federal Networks

    Federal government networks are under constant attack, and the number of those attacks is increasing. This issue brief discusses today's threats and a new model for the future.

    Download
  • Information Operations: Retaking the High Ground

    Today's threats are fluent in rapidly evolving areas of the Internet, especially social media. Learn how military organizations can secure an advantage in this developing arena.

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.