Welcome to the inaugural issue of The Army Brief, a weekly look at the news and ideas shaping the service’s future. I’m Caitlin Kenney, Defense One’s military services reporter. Cyber concerns. Thursday’s confirmation hearing for Army secretary nominee Christine Wormuth became a venue for senators to air their cybersecurity worries. Wormuth seemed to agree. “I am greatly concerned, frankly, by the threats that we face in the cyber domain. All you have to do is look at the long gas lines that are probably happening in your neighborhood right now,” she said, in the wake of a ransomware attack that closed a major pipeline. Read our coverage of the confirmation hearing, here. Army leaders drop end-strength dreams. Last week, Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville told House lawmakers that he’d like to add up to 70,000 soldiers, which would grow the force to some 550,000 troops. But on Monday, the Army’s top general appeared to surrender to the limited defense spending expected in President Joe Biden’s first Pentagon budget request. “Right now what we’ve done—at least, the secretary and I have agreed to—is we’re not going to grow the Army above 485,000-ish with the resources that we’re anticipating now,” McConville said during a virtual discussion Monday with the Atlantic Council. More, here. Brought to you by World Wide Technology (WWT) and Cisco Army Enterprise Cisco EA Community Page WWT and Cisco would like to invite you to the United States Army Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) Community Page, a resource dedicated to helping our customers get the most value out of EA. You can explore all of the advantages and technologies offered through the EA, view personalized experiences focused on the US Army's mission outcomes, and much more. Join the EA Community Page Longer lines at Arlington. The pandemic has lengthened the time it takes for people to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery, from up to nine months to about a year, Executive Director Karen Durham-Aguilera told the House Appropriations Committee last Wednesday. About 5,500 families are currently waiting to bury loved ones, including many whose burials were cancelled over the past year. The cemetery conducts 30 burials every day, five days a week, which is the most they can do with the resources and capabilities they have, Durham-Aguilera said. The cemetery also expects to have the new eligibility requirements for burials signed by the Army secretary — whoever he or she is — by fall. Sign up to get The Army Brief every Friday morning. On this day in 1942, Congress approved the creation of the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, which dropped “auxiliary” from its name a year later. The women served as airplane mechanics, cryptographers, and medical technicians at home and abroad during World War II.
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Welcome to the inaugural issue of The Army Brief, a weekly look at the news and ideas shaping the service’s future. I’m Caitlin Kenney, Defense One’s military services reporter. Cyber concerns. Thursday’s confirmation hearing for Army secretary nominee Christine Wormuth became a venue for senators to air their cybersecurity worries. Wormuth seemed to agree. “I am greatly concerned, frankly, by the threats that we face in the cyber domain. All you have to do is look at the long gas lines that are probably happening in your neighborhood right now,” she said, in the wake of a ransomware attack that closed a major pipeline. Read our coverage of the confirmation hearing, here. Army leaders drop end-strength dreams. Last week, Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville told House lawmakers that he’d like to add up to 70,000 soldiers, which would grow the force to some 550,000 troops. But on Monday, the Army’s top general appeared to surrender to the limited defense spending expected in President Joe Biden’s first Pentagon budget request. “Right now what we’ve done—at least, the secretary and I have agreed to—is we’re not going to grow the Army above 485,000-ish with the resources that we’re anticipating now,” McConville said during a virtual discussion Monday with the Atlantic Council. More, here. Brought to you by World Wide Technology (WWT) and Cisco Army Enterprise Cisco EA Community Page WWT and Cisco would like to invite you to the United States Army Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) Community Page, a resource dedicated to helping our customers get the most value out of EA. You can explore all of the advantages and technologies offered through the EA, view personalized experiences focused on the US Army's mission outcomes, and much more. Join the EA Community Page Longer lines at Arlington. The pandemic has lengthened the time it takes for people to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery, from up to nine months to about a year, Executive Director Karen Durham-Aguilera told the House Appropriations Committee last Wednesday. About 5,500 families are currently waiting to bury loved ones, including many whose burials were cancelled over the past year. The cemetery conducts 30 burials every day, five days a week, which is the most they can do with the resources and capabilities they have, Durham-Aguilera said. The cemetery also expects to have the new eligibility requirements for burials signed by the Army secretary — whoever he or she is — by fall. Sign up to get The Army Brief every Friday morning. On this day in 1942, Congress approved the creation of the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, which dropped “auxiliary” from its name a year later. The women served as airplane mechanics, cryptographers, and medical technicians at home and abroad during World War II.
The Army Brief
May 14, 2021
May 14, 2021

Welcome to the inaugural issue of The Army Brief, a weekly look at the news and ideas shaping the service's future. I'm Caitlin Kenney, Defense One's military services reporter.

Cyber concerns. Thursday's confirmation hearing for Army secretary nominee Christine Wormuth became a venue for senators to air their cybersecurity worries. Wormuth seemed to agree. "I am greatly concerned, frankly, by the threats that we face in the cyber domain. All you have to do is look at the long gas lines that are probably happening in your neighborhood right now," she said, in the wake of a ransomware attack that closed a major pipeline. Read our coverage of the confirmation hearing, here.

Army leaders drop end-strength dreams. Last week, Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville told House lawmakers that he'd like to add up to 70,000 soldiers, which would grow the force to some 550,000 troops. But on Monday, the Army's top general appeared to surrender to the limited defense spending expected in President Joe Biden's first Pentagon budget request. "Right now what we've done—at least, the secretary and I have agreed to—is we're not going to grow the Army above 485,000-ish with the resources that we're anticipating now," McConville said during a virtual discussion Monday with the Atlantic Council. More, here.

Brought to you by World Wide Technology (WWT) and Cisco

Army Enterprise Cisco EA Community Page

WWT and Cisco would like to invite you to the United States Army Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) Community Page, a resource dedicated to helping our customers get the most value out of EA. You can explore all of the advantages and technologies offered through the EA, view personalized experiences focused on the US Army's mission outcomes, and much more.

Join the EA Community Page

Longer lines at Arlington. The pandemic has lengthened the time it takes for people to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery, from up to nine months to about a year, Executive Director Karen Durham-Aguilera told the House Appropriations Committee last Wednesday. About 5,500 families are currently waiting to bury loved ones, including many whose burials were cancelled over the past year. The cemetery conducts 30 burials every day, five days a week, which is the most they can do with the resources and capabilities they have, Durham-Aguilera said. The cemetery also expects to have the new eligibility requirements for burials signed by the Army secretary — whoever he or she is — by fall.

Sign up to get The Army Brief every Friday morning. On this day in 1942, Congress approved the creation of the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps, which dropped "auxiliary" from its name a year later. The women served as airplane mechanics, cryptographers, and medical technicians at home and abroad during World War II.

 
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