Cyber Command Budget More Than Doubles

Shutterstock via Makhnach_S

AA Font size + Print

The House fiscal 2014 spending package includes $447 million for U.S. Cyber Command -- more than double last year’s budget. By Aliya Sternstein

The House approved a short-term federal spending bill on Tuesday to allow time for the expected passage of a fiscal 2014 spending package that includes $447 million for the Pentagon component that launches cyber weapons and deflects hacks against civilian and military networks. That’s more than a two-fold increase over Cyber Command’s fiscal 2013 budget of $191 million. The Senate was expected to clear the bill shortly. 

The funding jump is mostly attributed to the growth of cyber mission forces, Pentagon officials told Nextgov on Tuesday. In March 2013, about 834 active duty military and civilian personnel were on staff, Cyber Command chief Gen. Keith Alexander told lawmakers at the time. The goal is to grow cyber forces by 2,000 personnel annually, until 2016.

The boundary where the military takes over network defense from the Homeland Security Department is unclear, since cyberspace is not demarcated by geographic lines. For example, Cyber Command is bulking up “national mission forces” that will thwart incoming digital threats to American power, healthcare and other critical infrastructure sectors. Homeland Security is responsible for “leading a coordinated national response to significant cyber incidents,” a DHS spokesman said last year.

House lawmakers on Wednesday were poised to approve $792 million for cybersecurity at the Homeland Security Department in fiscal 2014. That is an increase of $35.5 million over last year.

DHS and Defense workforces are straining to protect Americans from disruptive hacks and cyberspying, government officials say. 

The number of cyber incidents agencies and all other sectors reported to DHS increased by 42 percent between fiscal 2011 and fiscal 2012, to a total of 153,043 cases, according to the most recent assessment of the government’s compliance with federal cyber legislation, released last spring. 

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the House had passed the full fiscal 2014 cybersecurity funding measure Monday. The chamber passed stop-gap legislation and approved the full spending bill on Wednesday.

Close [ x ] More from DefenseOne
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from DefenseOne.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • Federal IT Applications: Assessing Government's Core Drivers

    In order to better understand the current state of external and internal-facing agency workplace applications, Government Business Council (GBC) and Riverbed undertook an in-depth research study of federal employees. Overall, survey findings indicate that federal IT applications still face a gamut of challenges with regard to quality, reliability, and performance management.

    Download
  • PIV- I And Multifactor Authentication: The Best Defense for Federal Government Contractors

    This white paper explores NIST SP 800-171 and why compliance is critical to federal government contractors, especially those that work with the Department of Defense, as well as how leveraging PIV-I credentialing with multifactor authentication can be used as a defense against cyberattacks

    Download
  • GBC Issue Brief: Supply Chain Insecurity

    Federal organizations rely on state-of-the-art IT tools and systems to deliver services efficiently and effectively, and it takes a vast ecosystem of organizations, individuals, information, and resources to successfully deliver these products. This issue brief discusses the current threats to the vulnerable supply chain - and how agencies can prevent these threats to produce a more secure IT supply chain process.

    Download
  • Data-Centric Security vs. Database-Level Security

    Database-level encryption had its origins in the 1990s and early 2000s in response to very basic risks which largely revolved around the theft of servers, backup tapes and other physical-layer assets. As noted in Verizon’s 2014, Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR)1, threats today are far more advanced and dangerous.

    Download
  • Information Operations: Retaking the High Ground

    Today's threats are fluent in rapidly evolving areas of the Internet, especially social media. Learn how military organizations can secure an advantage in this developing arena.

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.