Today's D Brief: State’s new Afghan evac plans; Plane nearly hijacked in Kabul; Violence returns to Beirut; ‘Terrorism’ in Norway; And a bit more.

Wishful thinking? The U.S. wants “regular evacuation flights” out of Afghanistan to begin before the end of December, the Wall Street Journal reports Thursday morning from officials at Foggy Bottom.

Behind the scenes: “The State Department has yet to schedule a date to resume evacuation flights because it is still working through arrangements with neighboring countries,” a State Department official told the Journal. Some of the delays include lining up “documentation for travelers, permission to fly over other countries and procedures with the Taliban and foreign governments.”

One big hurdle: “The Taliban are requiring most Afghan travelers to have passports, a problem for some Afghans who fear they are at risk of retaliation” for working with the U.S. and its allies. Indeed, “Some have destroyed their documents or no longer have access to them.” Read on here.

ICYMI: A commercial plane was nearly hijacked leaving Kabul in the chaotic days of the Afghanistan evacuation, Defense One’s Tara Copp reported Wednesday.

Say what? Air Force Lt. Col. Brian Desautels, commander of the 71st Rescue Squadron and the personnel recovery task force, said in an Air Force release that after receiving intel about five people planning to hijack the commercial aircraft, “Our team worked to get them clear of the NATO ramp, relocated to the north side away from friendly forces, then ultimately onto the south side where the situation was handled.”

In the meantime, “A couple thousand” additional evacuees have been able to leave Afghanistan since the Aug. 31 end to the official evacuation “as a rare pairing of Biden administration staff and private organizations try to finish the work of the largest, most chaotic, and most dangerous emergency airlift in U.S. history,” Copp writes. About 100 private groups, mainly run by Afghanistan veterans, have stayed in the country to help complete the evacuation. Read more at Defense One, here.


From Defense One

The Inventor of the Taser and the Body Cam Wants to Put Them on Drones // Patrick Tucker: His pitch: non-lethal, robotically deployed Tasers can change the face of war.

An Afghanistan Evac Flight Was Almost Hijacked, Air Force Reveals  // Tara Copp: While the chaos at HKIA is over, the effort to evacuate Afghans is not. Here’s how the U.S. is still getting people out.

Head of Pentagon Foreign Arms Sales Division Stepping Down After 15 Months on the Job // Marcus Weisgerber: Heidi Grant was the first civilian to lead the Defense Security Cooperation Agency.

Will Americans Buy into Biden’s Ambitious Domestic Terrorism Plan? // Karen J. Greenberg: The president’s national strategy pivots the United States away from the worst practices of the war on terrorism—if law enforcement, courts, and agencies will follow.

Welcome to this Thursday edition of The D Brief from Ben Watson and Jennifer Hlad. If you’re not already subscribed to The D Brief, you can do that here. On this day in 1912, former President Theodore Roosevelt was shot in the chest while campaigning in Milwaukee, Wisc. The bullet went through his steel eyeglass case and a folded 50-page copy of his speech for later that afternoon, but Roosevelt determined it hadn’t gone deep enough to send him to the hospital. So he delivered his 90-minute speech with that bullet lodged into his chest. He would carry it there until his death almost seven years later. His attempted assassin was found to be insane and sent to a hospital, where he remained until his death in 1943. 


Gunfire has broken out in Beirut today and now six people are dead after a Hezbollah-linked protest turned violent in the streets of the storied Mediterranean coastal city. The Lebanese Red Cross said 30 others were wounded in the shooting. And shortly after it began, the Lebanese military arrived on scene and tweeted out a warning that its soldiers “will fire on anyone who is armed and present on the streets and at anyone that shoots from anywhere else.”
FWIW: Lebanon’s 15-year civil war “ended in 1990, but Thursday’s battles were fought along the fault lines that divided the city 21 years ago,” the Wall Street Journal reports from Beirut. 

President Biden welcomes his Kenyan counterpart, President Uhuru Kenyatta, to the White House this afternoon. Biden plans to discuss nearly a dozen non-military topics with the president of Kenya, which neighbors Somalia and hosts a small contingent of U.S. troops—a contingent that was attacked by al-Shabaab fighters on Jan. 2020, killing one U.S. soldier and two contractors. But “advanc[ing] peace and security” is also on the day’s agenda, so the fight against al-Shabaab could figure in. 

Bow-and-arrow ‘terrorism’ leaves 5 dead outside of Oslo. Norwegian authorities are treating the death of five people in the small town of Kongsberg as an act of terrorism, a regional police chief said today, hours after a suspect attacked what seemed to be random strangers at a grocery store and on the streets of Kongsberg Wednesday evening around 6 p.m. local time.
Police arrested the suspect—a 37-year-old Danish man suspected of being radicalized into militant Islam—30 minutes after he first reportedly attacked using a bow and arrow and allegedly other weapons that have yet to be named by law enforcement officials. However, a regional prosecutor told the Associated Press the arrested suspect “clearly described what he had done. He admitted killing the five people.” Reuters has more on the “signs of radicalization” behind this tragic episode, here.

Lastly today: The U.S. Army is hitting pause on its augmented reality headset program with Microsoft, which is worth almost $22 billion, Janes reported Wednesday.
Left unanswered: Why it happened, and what impact it might have, both Janes and The Drive emphasize—with the latter going into past developmental missteps, like devices that don’t function in the rain, e.g. At any rate, “the decision is certainly not good news for the immediate future of a program the service had been touting as potentially game-changing for individual soldiers,” Joseph Trevithick writes. Read on, here.

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.